Curètes dancing around the infant Zeus, as pictured in Themis by Jane Ellen Harrison (1912,-horz

Camille Paglia says many Feminists have ignored Jane Ellen Harrison‘s career and I can’t help but agree because Harrison and I have shared interests. Harrison drew the drawing, on the left; which depicts the Kouretes (the Cabeiri) dancing around baby Zeus. When I read about Harrison—I identified her as a rational Feminist and I consider Paglia, as amongst the rational.

Harrison focused on career, not protests. Her spiritual daughter Hope Mirrlees broke into the Science Fiction and Fantasy award without the help of many women because women were not the common readers of those genres, at that time. Men didn’t stop women from enjoying Fantasy and Sci-Fi—women created their own definitions of womanhood. Many Feminists blame males for the definition, but peers create the definition.

Feminist factions play a role in my novel, as do the Cabeiri. I’m working on creating a schism between the factions and character named ‘Hope Harrison’ seems the likely way that I will ode, Harrison and Mirrlees. The fruit may be the symbol of her faction because rational feminism is about prizing the fruit; whether it be, the fruit of your labors or the fruit of the loin. The Cabeiri represent and guard the fruit of Mother Earth; whether her name is Gaea, Cybele, Rhea, Flora, or Demeter.

In Chapter I: The Hymn of the Kouretes, p. 1 and 26. On page 26, Harrison describes the Kouretes as, “primitive magicians…seers (μαντεις). When Minos in Crete lost his son Glaukos he sent for the Kouretes to discover where the child was hidden. Closely akin to this magical aspect is that fact that they are metal-workers. Among primitive people metallurgy is an uncanny craft and the smith is half medicine man.”

Harrison describes the Kourete dance as a ‘ghost dance’ —  a dance honoring ancestral heroes.

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