Be careful about what you preview you just completed novel on. The wide screen of my computer monitor, the best look is a simple look– a break between paragraphs and no indent *no css stylesheet is needed). My eBook app, ‘freda’, appears to ignore stylesheets; it automatically indents and removes paragraph breaks. My novel looked best with an app named ‘Book Bazaar Reader’ and it responded to my stylesheet.

The screen width matters. An indent with no paragraph break has the most consistent look, on the different screen sizes and that’s why it’s the common format for an eBook. My computer has a limited number of fonts and ‘Georgia” is probably the best that I have available, but I’m sure I can download other fonts.

I’m making a few gambles with my punctuation; which, probably hurt my chances with agents, because I left out the quotation marks and skipped dialogue tags—I have an alternate method to keep track of who’s talking. My main character is in every conversation, so I just introduce the other person in the conversation and on rare occasion, the multiple people. A colon will mark the alternate speakers ant the main character’s dialogue can remain clean. Another trick can be added, such as tapping the colon to identify the other speaker.

I test my eBook coding with both Calibre and Sigil, they don’t always agree on what is clean code. The first edition will probably be free of extra material and just provide a link to further info. Many ideas, about how to handle things, come to mind. When you tap the previously mentioned colon, the character’s image could pop up.

Manuel Puig used a punctuation gimmick in his novel, Kiss of the Spider Woman.” He uses a – to denote a change in speakers. I have my own Spider Women, so we share a couple of concepts. Personally, I prefer my idea with a colon because screenplays use colons for dialogue and my method probably wouldn’t even distract Cormac McCarthy, a noted hater of punctuation marking.

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